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MSII Courses

Foundations & Skin  (Unit 1)

Course #: MFSK201
Course Credit: 5

Director:

Tom Poole, PhD
Tom Poole, PhD
(Cell and Developmental
Biology)
 


Administrator:

Ashley Scott
(until position is filled)

 

This first Unit will prepare you for rest of the MS2 year and the Step 1 exam by focusing our attention on principles of pharmacology and general pathology. The foundations of pharmacology and pathology will include mechanisms of drug effects, cell injury and death, tissue repair and regeneration. We will then consider the pathogens responsible for, and the treatment of, skin infections.

Hematology & Oncology  (Unit 2)

Course #: MHON201
Course Credit: 4

Directors:

Diana Gilligan Tom Poole, PhD
Diana Gilligan, MD, PhD
(Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology)
Tom Poole, PhD
(Cell and Developmental
Biology)


 

Administrator:

Ashley Scott
Ashley Scott

 

Unit 2 covers benign and malignant disorders of blood and lymphatic organs. Hematopathology and molecular diagnostics are emphasized in the differential diagnosis of leukemias and lymphomas. Inherited and acquired blood disorders are studied, including defects in the development of blood cells and blood clotting factors. The selective and appropriate use of blood components in transfusion medicine are presented. Blood-borne pathogens are discussed with an emphasis on HIV pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and treatment. Pharmacological agents used to treat cancers are presented. The immunological basis for many hematological disorders is discussed and novel treatments that are immune-based are covered.

Renal, Reproductive, Endocrine (Unit 3)

Course #: MENR201
Course Credit: 5

Director:

Tom Poole, PhD
Tom Poole, PhD
(Cell and Developmental
Biology)


Administrator:

Ashley Scott
(until position is filled)

 

The home stretch! Students enter this Unit coming off of winter break and anxious about the year in which they take Step 1. High yield clinical content in the Unit includes syphilis, systemic lupus erythematosus, sexually transmitted infections, arthritis, gout, breast cancer, and male and female reproductive pathology. Renal pathophysiology receives comprehensive attention in this Unit. Pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, and bone pathology, including derangements in metabolic homeostasis, will be covered. The pharmacology related to treating alterations within endocrine axes will be coupled with clinical case discussions. Congenital and consequent neonatal infection will be surveyed. Step 1 relevance will be maintained throughout by citing histopathologic, laboratory, radiographic, and patient characteristics that betray the mechanistic underpinnings of disease, which drive the Step 1 examination.

Cardiovascular, Respiratory II  (Unit 4)

Course #: MCVR201
Course Credit: 5

Director:

Rebecca Greenblatt, PhD
Rebecca Greenblatt, PhD
(Microbiology/Immunology)

 

Administrator:

Ashley Scott
Ashley Scott

 

This Unit builds on the foundation of MS1 Unit 5.  Students will use their knowledge of normal cardiac and pulmonary function as they learn to differentiate the deficiencies associated with infection, neoplasm, and anatomical pathology. Successful learners will be able to describe the common diseases that affect these systems, the most useful imaging and laboratory tests for differentiating among them, and the first-line treatments. When the first-line treatment is pharmacological, the Unit will include discussion of dosage and side effects. Lectures will include multiple examples of clinical relevance, and will coordinate, as do all other units, with case-based learning in the Foundations of Reasoning in Medicine course and clinical learning in the Practice of Medicine course.

Nervous System II (Unit 5)

Course #: MNSY201
Course Credit: 5

Directors:

Dana Mihaila, MD, PhD Rita Gamamurthy, MD

Dana Mihaila, MD, PhD
(Cell and
Developmental Biology)

Gita Ramamurthy, MD
(Psychiatry &
Behavioral Sciences)

 

Administrator:

TBD

 

 





Unit 5 Nervous System will provide a vertical integration with the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system studied in the first year, as well as a horizontal integration between behavioral sciences, pathology and pharmacology of the nervous system in the second year. Students will be guided toward a clear understanding of human behavior, behavioral manifestations of illness, psychopathology, diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders, including the pharmacological principles of modern therapeutics (mechanism of action, clinical indications and side effects of the drugs). CNS and muscle pathology will be described with an emphasis on common tumors in adult and pediatric populations, as well as common neurodegenerative conditions. Modern evolving areas such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy and molecular features of tumors will be covered. Eye, and head and neck pathology, will also be discussed. Histologic features and prognosis will be emphasized.

Gastrointestinal II (Unit 6)

Course #: MGSI201
Course Credit: 4

Directors:

M. Osman Arif, MD Rebecca Greenblatt, PhD
M. Osman Arif, MD
(Internal Medicine)
Rebecca Greenblatt, PhD
(Microbiology/Immunology)

 

Administrator:

Ashley Scott
Ashley Scott

 

This Unit builds on the foundations of MS1 Unit 7 and MS2 Unit 5. Students will use their knowledge of normal endocrine and digestive function to understand the deficiencies associated with infection, neoplasm, and anatomical pathology of the pancreas, liver, and GI. Successful learners will be able to describe the common diseases that affect these systems, their clinical manifestations, the most useful imaging and laboratory tests for differentiating among them, and their first-line treatments. When the first-line treatment is pharmacological, the Unit will include discussion of dosage and side effects. Lectures and team-based learning sessions will include multiple examples of clinical relevance, and will coordinate with case-based learning in the Foundations of Reasoning in Medicine course and clinical learning in the Practice of Medicine course.

Foundations of Reasoning in Medicine II  (FRM 2)

Course #: MFRM201
Course Credit: 5

Directors:

William Paolo, MD Matthew Thornton, MD
Matthew Thornton, MD
(Emergency Medicine)
William Paolo, MD
(Emergency Medicine)

 

Administrator:

Sarah Clawson
Sarah Clawson

 

This longitudinal course is designed to promote the thought processes necessary to develop a student's intellectual capacity as a practicing physician. Similar to FRM-1 in the MS1 year, FRM-2 is an active, case-based learning course that integrates with the horizontally constructed system-based Units of year 2, in order to align with content for each individual block. These interactive sessions are done in small groups of approximately 10 students. FRM-2 is primarily designed to teach the clinical reasoning skills necessary to evaluate patients, understand disease and make rational, evidence-based decisions. These goals will be accomplished through small group sessions, during which students will be expected to work through clinical cases in order to elicit the main teaching points of the sessions, develop differential diagnoses, and concept maps for the diagnosis and treatment of the disease their simulated patients will possess. Students will continue to have exposure to the domains of ethics, law, biostatistics, epidemiology, economics, public policy, medical anthropology and sociology, and population health, which were taught during Patients to Populations in the MS1 year. In addition, Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) is a component of this course.

Practice of Medicine II  (POM 2)

Course #: MPOM201
Course Credit: 8

Directors:

Joni Mitchell, MD Alison McCrone, MD
Joni Mitchell, MD
(UME Office)
Alison McCrone, MD
(UME Office)

 

Administrator:

Kelly Donovan
Kelly Donovan

 

Students will further master efficient medical interviewing, physical examination and communication skills with patients. Students will explore how to synthesize data gathering information into a plausible explanation of the patient’s health status. Students will learn patterns of disease and syndromes in a small group setting with peers and by working closely with standardized patients. They will also continue to develop their skill at efficiently presenting a patient in, and develop initial treatment plans for, a variety of common diagnoses seen in clinical practice.

Link to Academic Schedules

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