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Courses, Clerkships & Electives

MSI Courses

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Molecules, Cells, Microbes (MCM) (Units 1-2)

Course #: MMCM102
Course Credit: 8

Directors:

Rebecca Greenblatt, PhD Thomas Duncan, PhD
Rebecca Greenblatt, PhD
(Microbiology/Immunology)
Thomas Duncan, PhD
(Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology)

Administrator:

Sandra Jarvis
Sandra Jarvis

 

This 7-week course, spanning Units 1 and 2 with a 1 week intercession between the units, presents foundational material in the subject areas of Bacteriology, Virology, Parasitology, Cell and Molecular Biology, Microscopic Anatomy, Biochemistry, Genetics, Developmental Biology and Immunology. This material will be enhanced by frequent illustration of patient care applications in lectures, clinically-oriented small group sessions, and microscopic anatomy laboratories. The primary purpose of this course is to prepare students for systems-based coursework which begins in Unit 3 of MS1 and extends through the end of the MS2 year.

Musculoskeletal (Unit 3)

Course #: MMSK101
Course Credit: 5

Directors:

Jennette Ball Paul Klawitter, MD
Jennette Ball, DC
(Cell and Developmental Biology)
Paul Klawitter, MD
(Emergency Medicine)


Administrator:

Sarah Clawson
Sarah Clawson

 

Students will learn the clinical implications and physiology of normal and microscopic anatomy of the musculoskeletal system, including muscles, bones, neurovascular supply, and joint structures. Students will learn the normal gross and microscopic anatomy of the skin including surface anatomy and an introduction to cadaver dissection. The basic physiological processes involved in maintaining homeostasis are examined throughout this course. During this Unit, students will be given multiple clinical cases to enhance their learning. Learning will be enriched by case-based sessions, radiologic demonstrations, hands on lab work, and clinically oriented small groups.

Nervous System I (Unit 4)

Course #: MNSY101
Course Credit: 6

Directors:

Dana Mihaila, MD, PhD James Megna, MD, PhD Rick Matthews, MD
Dana Mihaila, MD, PhD
(Cell and Developmental
Biology)
James Megna, MD, PhD
(Psychiatry)
Rick Matthews, MD
(Neuroscience & Physiology)

 

Administrator:

Wendi Burnette Sarah Clawson
Wendi Burnette Sarah Clawson

 

 

 

This Unit will provide students with current scientific knowledge of human nervous system structure and function. Students will also begin to develop an understanding of abnormalities in nervous system structure/function and disease states. Instruction will include primary exposure to, and appreciation of, how nervous system pathology manifests in abnormal clinical and laboratory findings.

Cardiovascular, Respiratory I (Unit 5)

Course #: MCVR101
Course Credit: 5

Directors:

Robert Zajdel, PhD Dr. Dhamoon
Robert Zajdel, PhD
(Cell and Developmental Biology)
Amit Dhamoon, MD, PhD
(Medicine)


Administrator:

Sarah Clawson
Sarah Clawson

 

This Unit will emphasize medical knowledge as it applies to cardiovascular and respiratory disease. Learning objectives include anatomic structure and physiologic function of the heart, lungs, airways and blood vessels. These structures will be studied in the neck and thorax with continuity of the circulatory, nervous, and major structures between the regions. Radiographic imaging and clinical testing modalities such as electrocardiograms (EKGs) will be presented to support integration and application of clinical content. Large lectures, small group studies, case based teaching, clinical vignettes and hands-on interactions will reinforce Unit learning objectives and engage the student for development of life-long learning skills.

Urinary, Respiratory II (Unit 6)

Course #: MURR101
Course Credit: 4

Directors:

Mary Lou Vallano, PhD
Mary Lou Vallano, PhD
(Neuroscience & Physiology)
Co-Director TBD

 

Administrator:

Wendi Burnette
Wendi Burnette

 

After the completion of this Unit, students will be able to describe the micro and macro function of the urinary system as well as the upper airway respiratory system. Student will demonstrate a strong understanding of the mechanisms of renal physiology, and respiratory physiology in preparation for year 2 when pharmacology and pathology of the kidney and lungs will be discussed.  These foundations will allow students to successfully interpret clinical scenarios encompassing, but not limited to, laboratory studies, radiologic studies, and clinical case scenarios. 

Gastrointestinal I (Unit 7)

Course #: MGSI101
Course Credit: 5

Directors:

Thomas Duncan, PhD Ronald Szyjkowski, MD
Thomas Duncan, PhD
(Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology)
Ron Szyjkowski, MD
(Medicine)

 

Administrator:

Sandra Jarvis
Sandra Jarvis

 

This Unit will provide a comprehensive and thorough coverage of the normal gastrointestinal tract. Special attention will be given to specific disease states and clinical presentations, and how they arise from both changes in physiology, cell structure and the underlying metabolic disruptions. Upon completion of this Unit, students will be expected to interpret, integrate and demonstrate the structural, metabolic, and physiological function of the GI tract in a normal state. Students will also be able to relate the normal state to the disease state.

Endocrine, Reproductive (Unit 8)

Course #: MENR101
Course Credit: 4

Directors:

Rachel Hopkins, MD Mary Lou Vallano, PhD
Rachel Hopkins, MD
(Medicine)
Mary Lou Vallano, PhD
(Neuroscience and Physiology)


Administrator:

Wendi Burnette
Wendi Burnette

 

In this Unit, students will learn to recognize and understand the normal structure and function of the major endocrine and reproductive organs and glands. This includes the hypothalamus, pituitary, adrenal, thyroid, parathyroid, pancreas, gonads, and reproductive organs. Foundational lectures on vitamins and minerals are also included. Students will gain an understanding of the intricate interplay of hormonal pathways that contribute to normal endocrine and reproductive function. Using clinical, laboratory, radiology and pathologic data, students will begin to identify the ways in which the balance of these systems can be disturbed, leading to common and uncommon endocrine and reproductive disorders.

Foundations of Reasoning in Medicine I (FRM I)

Course #: MFRM101
Course Credit: 2.5

Directors:

Matthew Thornton, MD
Matthew Thornton, MD
(Emergency Medicine)
Director

 

Administrator (Interim):

Theresa Stowell
Theresa Stowell

 

This longitudinal course integrates clinical medical reasoning into our curriculum. FRM-1 is an active, case-based learning course that integrates with the horizontally constructed system-based Units of year 1, in order to align with content for each individual block. These interactive sessions are done in small groups of approximately 10 students. They involve evidenced-based medicine, small group presentations, and active participation with self-directed learning during the discussion of each clinical presentation.

Patients to Populations: Ethics, Law and Population Health (PTP)

Course #: MPTP101
Course Credit: 2.5

Directors:

Travis Hobart, MD, MPH Amy Caruso Brown, MD
Travis Hobart, MD, MPH
Co-Director
(Patients to Populations)
(Pediatrics)
Amy Caruso Brown, MD
Co-Director
(Patients to Populations)
(Bioethics and Humanities)

Administrator (Interim):

Theresa Stowell
Theresa Stowell

 

This is a longitudinal, case-based course in bioethics, law, population health, epidemiology, healthcare policy, and related social science disciplines. The course begins with a series of foundational lectures during Units 1 and 2. In Units 2 through 8, students will meet regularly with peers and expert faculty facilitators from the Center for Bioethics and Humanities and the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine to engage in case-based small group discussion. All cases begin with an encounter between patient and physician and work outward to a discussion of health systems, policy and social accountability. Self-directed learning, in the form of independent preparation for small group discussions, is expected. Assessment is based upon small group participation, performance on multiple-choice examinations, group presentations, and written assignments.

Practice of Medicine I (POM I)

Course #: MPOM105
Course Credit: 7

Directors:

Photo not available Alison McCrone, MD
Marissa Smith, MD
(UME Office)
Alison McCrone, MD
(UME Office)

Administrator:

Mary Sullivan
Mary Sullivan

 

The Practice of Medicine (POM) course spans the first and second years of medical school. In the first year of the course, students integrate scientific knowledge and clinical content by working closely with clinicians in small groups learning to perform clinical examinations and interviews, and learning to develop communication skills essential in quality patient care. Students will have online lectures, reading and physical examination videos that complement their small group learning. Students will learn how to develop problem lists, differential diagnoses and how to efficiently present patients to their peer colleagues.


MSII Courses

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Foundations & Skin (Unit 1)

Course #: MFSK201
Course Credit: 5

Directors:

Tom Poole, PhD Daniel Zaccarini, MD
Tom Poole, PhD
(Cell and Developmental
Biology)
Daniel Zaccarini, MD
(Pathology)
 


Administrator:

Ashley Scott

Ashley Scott

 

This first Unit will prepare you for rest of the MS2 year and the Step 1 exam by focusing our attention on principles of pharmacology and general pathology. The foundations of pharmacology and pathology will include mechanisms of drug effects, cell injury and death, tissue repair and regeneration. We will then consider the pathogens responsible for, and the treatment of, skin infections.

Hematology & Oncology (Unit 2)

Course #: MHON201
Course Credit: 4

Directors:

Diana Gilligan Tom Poole, PhD
Diana Gilligan, MD, PhD
(Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology)
Scott Blystone, PhD
(Cell and Developmental
Biology)


 

Administrator:

Ashley Scott
Ashley Scott

 

Unit 2 covers benign and malignant disorders of blood and lymphatic organs. Hematopathology and molecular diagnostics are emphasized in the differential diagnosis of leukemias and lymphomas. Inherited and acquired blood disorders are studied, including defects in the development of blood cells and blood clotting factors. The selective and appropriate use of blood components in transfusion medicine are presented. Blood-borne pathogens are discussed with an emphasis on HIV pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and treatment. Pharmacological agents used to treat cancers are presented. The immunological basis for many hematological disorders is discussed and novel treatments that are immune-based are covered.

Renal, Reproductive, Endocrine (Unit 3)

Course #: MENR201
Course Credit: 5

Directors:

Tom Poole, PhD John J Folk, MD
Tom Poole, PhD
(Cell and Developmental
Biology)
John Folk, MD
(Obstetrics & Gynecology)


Administrator:

Susan Anderson
Susan Anderson

 

High yield clinical content in the Unit includes syphilis, systemic lupus erythematosus, sexually transmitted infections, arthritis, gout, breast cancer, and male and female reproductive pathology. Renal pathophysiology receives comprehensive attention in this Unit. Pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, and bone pathology, including derangements in metabolic homeostasis, will be covered. The pharmacology related to treating alterations within endocrine axes will be coupled with clinical case discussions. Congenital and consequent neonatal infection will be surveyed. Step 1 relevance will be maintained throughout by citing histopathologic, laboratory, radiographic, and patient characteristics that betray the mechanistic underpinnings of disease, which drive the Step 1 examination.

Cardiovascular, Respiratory II (Unit 4)

Course #: MCVR201
Course Credit: 5

Directors:

Rebecca Greenblatt, PhD Amit Dhamoon, MD, PhD
Rebecca Greenblatt, PhD
(Microbiology/Immunology)
Amit Dhamoon, MD, PhD
(Medicine)

 

Administrator:

Ashley Scott
Ashley Scott

 

This Unit builds on the foundation of MS1 Unit 5.  Students will use their knowledge of normal cardiac and pulmonary function as they learn to differentiate the deficiencies associated with infection, neoplasm, and anatomical pathology. Successful learners will be able to describe the common diseases that affect these systems, the most useful imaging and laboratory tests for differentiating among them, and the first-line treatments. When the first-line treatment is pharmacological, the Unit will include discussion of dosage and side effects. Lectures will include multiple examples of clinical relevance, and will coordinate, as do all other units, with case-based learning in the Foundations of Reasoning in Medicine course and clinical learning in the Practice of Medicine course.

Nervous System II (Unit 5)

Course #: MNSY201
Course Credit: 5

Directors:

Dana Mihaila, MD, PhD Rita Gamamurthy, MD

Dana Mihaila, MD, PhD
(Cell and
Developmental Biology)

Gita Ramamurthy, MD
(Psychiatry &
Behavioral Sciences)

 

Administrator:

Colleen Denniston
Colleen Denniston

 

 




Unit 5 Nervous System will provide a vertical integration with the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system studied in the first year, as well as a horizontal integration between behavioral sciences, pathology and pharmacology of the nervous system in the second year. Students will be guided toward a clear understanding of human behavior, behavioral manifestations of illness, psychopathology, diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders, including the pharmacological principles of modern therapeutics (mechanism of action, clinical indications and side effects of the drugs). CNS and muscle pathology will be described with an emphasis on common tumors in adult and pediatric populations, as well as common neurodegenerative conditions. Modern evolving areas such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy and molecular features of tumors will be covered. Eye, and head and neck pathology, will also be discussed. Histologic features and prognosis will be emphasized.

Gastrointestinal II (Unit 6)

Course #: MGSI201
Course Credit: 4

Directors:

M. Osman Arif, MD Rebecca Greenblatt, PhD
M. Osman Arif, MD
(Internal Medicine)
Rebecca Greenblatt, PhD
(Microbiology/Immunology)

 

Administrator:

Ashley Scott
Ashley Scott

 

This Unit builds on the foundations of MS1 Unit 7 and MS2 Unit 5. Students will use their knowledge of normal endocrine and digestive function to understand the deficiencies associated with infection, neoplasm, and anatomical pathology of the pancreas, liver, and GI. Successful learners will be able to describe the common diseases that affect these systems, their clinical manifestations, the most useful imaging and laboratory tests for differentiating among them, and their first-line treatments. When the first-line treatment is pharmacological, the Unit will include discussion of dosage and side effects. Lectures and team-based learning sessions will include multiple examples of clinical relevance, and will coordinate with case-based learning in the Foundations of Reasoning in Medicine course and clinical learning in the Practice of Medicine course.

Foundations of Reasoning in Medicine II (FRM 2)

Course #: MFRM201
Course Credit: 5

Director:

Matthew Thornton, MD
Matthew Thornton, MD
(Emergency Medicine)
 

 

Administrator:

Theresa Stowell
Theresa Stowell

 

This longitudinal course is designed to promote the thought processes necessary to develop a student's intellectual capacity as a practicing physician. Similar to FRM-1 in the MS1 year, FRM-2 is an active, case-based learning course that integrates with the horizontally constructed system-based Units of year 2, in order to align with content for each individual block. These interactive sessions are done in small groups of approximately 10 students. FRM-2 is primarily designed to teach the clinical reasoning skills necessary to evaluate patients, understand disease and make rational, evidence-based decisions. These goals will be accomplished through small group sessions, during which students will be expected to work through clinical cases in order to elicit the main teaching points of the sessions, develop differential diagnoses, and concept maps for the diagnosis and treatment of the disease their simulated patients will possess. Students will continue to have exposure to the domains of ethics, law, biostatistics, epidemiology, economics, public policy, medical anthropology and sociology, and population health, which were taught during Patients to Populations in the MS1 year. In addition, Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) is a component of this course.

Practice of Medicine II (POM 2)

Course #: MPOM201
Course Credit: 8

Directors:

Photo not available Alison McCrone, MD
Marissa Smith, MD
(UME Office)
Alison McCrone, MD
(UME Office)

 

Administrator:

Mary Sullivan
Mary Sullivan

 

Students will further master efficient medical interviewing, physical examination and communication skills with patients. Students will explore how to synthesize data gathering information into a plausible explanation of the patient’s health status. Students will learn patterns of disease and syndromes in a small group setting with peers and by working closely with standardized patients. They will also continue to develop their skill at efficiently presenting a patient in, and develop initial treatment plans for, a variety of common diagnoses seen in clinical practice.


MSIII Required Clerkships

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Clinical Bioethics

Syr/Bing Course #: CBHX2400
Syr/Bing Course Credit:
1

Director: Thomas Curran, MD
Syr Administrator: Kathy Szczech
Site Director: Marita Powell, MD
Bing Administrator: Donna Dranchok

In this longitudinal concurrent case-based course which spans the third year, students meet in small groups with a faculty tutor to discuss ethical issues presented in patient care and practice communication skills. Students bring their own cases for discussion, and faculty provide other cases to provide the opportunity to discuss and learn about ethical principles and a method of case analysis for ethical concerns raised in patient care. Advanced communication skills are addressed in this course.

Emergency Medicine Clerkship 

Syr/Bing Course #: EMED1300
Syr/Bing Course Credit: 2.5

Directors: Matthew Sarsfield, MD & Jennifer Campoli, DO
Syr Administrator: TBD
Site Director:
Stephen Gomez, MD
Bing Administrator: Kelly Cortright

EM Pocket Card

This two week rotation introduces students to core concepts and principles in Emergency Medicine. Emphasis is on focused history and physical examination skills, developing a differential diagnosis, and developing clinical care plans. Principles of trauma care, shock and critically ill patients, and other acute life threatening illness will be taught in the clinical setting as well as in the Simulation Center.

Family Medicine Clerkship 

Syr/Bing Course #: FAMP1600
Syr/Bing Course Credit: 4.5

Directors: Tom LaClair, MD
Syr Administrator: Zoreslava Osiv
Site Director:
Lazarus Gehring, MD
Bing Administrator: Donna Dranchok

FM Pocket Card

"This ambulatory-based clerkship provides training in the basic tenets of primary, family-based care. Clinical preventive medicine and the treatment of acute and chronic diseases are emphasized in both clinical and didactic aspects of the clerkship.

What are the goals of the clerkship? The goals of the clerkship are for every medical student to:

  • have point-of-care training in a family doctor’s office
  • demonstrate competence in the core knowledge and skills of family medicine
  • understand the role of the family physician

Additionally, students will recognize that high quality information, balanced with patient preferences and clinical judgement, is the basis for intelligent decision making. Developing an understanding of the intellectual process and acquiring the skills for life-long learning will assist students in achieving the goals of the Family Medicine Clerkship."

http://www.upstate.edu/fmed/education/clerkship.php

Internal Medicine Clerkship 

Syr/Bing Course #: MDCN2000
Syr/Bing Course Credit: 10

Director: Zachary Shepherd, MD
Syr Administrator: Lisa Oliver
Site Director: Thomas Genese, MD
Bing Administrator: Maureen Savona

IM Pocket Card

Through active participation in the care of inpatients and outpatients, the third-year student continues to develop knowledge and skill in diagnosis and acquire experience in the fundamentals of treatment.Students take medical histories, perform physical examinations and outline programs of treatment on assigned patients.

THREADS:

Geriatrics

Director: Jeanne Bishop, MD
Syr Administrator: Kelly Wheeler
Site Director: Rana Ahmad, MD
Bing Administrator: Penny Holt

Palliative Care (EPEC)

Director: Barbara Krenzer, MD
Syr Administrator: Jamie Murphy
Site Director: Rana Ahmad, MD
Bing Administrator: Penny Holt

Neuroscience Clerkship 

Syr/Bing Course #: NEUR3000
Syr/Bing Course Credit: 5

Directors: Michael Vertino, MDMichael Galgano, MD (Neurosurgery)
Syr Administrator: John Reidy
Site Directors: Yahia Lodi, MD 
Bing Administrator: Maureen Savona

Neuro Pocket Card

This five-week clerkship integrates neurology and neurosurgery instruction. Students see common and uncommon neurological disorders and obtain concentrated training in taking a neurological history and performing a neurologic examination. A core curriculum emphasizes neurologic topics common in general practice. Core Topics in ophthalmology are also included.

Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship 

Syr/Bing Course #: OBGY3600
Syr/Bing Course Credit: 5

Directors: John Folk, MD & George Stanley, MD
Syr Administrator: Christine Rydelek
Site Director: Patrick Ruggiero, MD
Bing Administrator: Kelly Cortright

OB/Gyn Pocket Card

Online core topic modules and active participation in patient care form the basis for this clerkship. We provide clinical opportunities for students to develop skills and knowledge related to antepartum care, management of normal labor and delivery, postpartum care, and common ambulatory and inpatient gynecologic concerns. We emphasize the importance of women's health care in all aspects of a well-educated and prepared physician.

Pediatrics Clerkship 

Syr/Bing Course #: PEDS5600
Syr/Bing Course Credit: 5

Directors: Jennifer Nead, MD & Leah Bennett, MD/MPH
Syr Administrator: Chris Kuehnle
Site Director: Paula Farrell, MD
Bing Administrator: Kelly Cortright

Peds Pocket Card

Provides students with a basis for understanding the interrelationships of growth factors and development in health and disease. Students develop basic skills in taking pediatric histories; perform physical examinations on newborns, infants and older children; assess the childrens developmental levels; and interpret clinical data. Preventive pediatrics is emphasized.

Population Health for Physicians 

Syr/Bing Course #: PRVM6400
Syr/Bing Course Credit: 0.5

Director: Travis Hobart, MD, MPH
Syr Administrator: Zoreslava Osiv
Site Director: Christopher Ryan, MD
Bing Administrator: Donna Dranchok

Pop Health Pocket Card

A longitudinal course covering public health, clinical prevention and emergency preparedness topics during the clinical rotations.

Psychiatry Clerkship 

Syr/Bing Course #: PYCH6800
Syr/Bing Course Credit: 5

Directors: Hilary Gamble, MD & Rachael Kuch-Cecconi, MD
Syr Administrator: Cassandra Read
Site Director: Purushothaman Muthukanagaraj, MD
Bing Administrator: Maureen Savona

Psych Pocket Card

In this psychiatry clerkship, students learn interviewing techniques, refine diagnostic skills, prepare case studies and participate in the treatment programs of the ward to which they are assigned. Liaison/consultation psychiatry is also emphasized. Students learn to evaluate patients in the ER and outpatient clinics. Faculty provide seminars to review psychopathology and treatment methods.

Surgery and Surgical Subspecialties Clerkship 

Syr/Bing Course #: SURG8200
Syr/Bing Course Credit: 7

Directors: Roseanna Guzman-Curtis, MD, MPH and Michael Luca, DO
Syr Administrator: Rebecca Bellini
Site Director: Leonard Anderson, MD
Bing Administrator: Kelly Cortright

Surgery Pocket Card

During this clerkship, the student participates in the care and management of patients on general surgical services as well as subspecialty services. Bedside, clinic, and operating room instruction is supplemented by Wise MD case and Skills Modules and sub-speciality lectures. Students learn to recognize problems of a surgical nature, to understand the relevant pathophysiology and to gain some familiarity with surgical therapy.

The RMED Experience

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RMED 

Syr Course #: FAMP1650
Syr Course Credit: 4
Director: Carrie Roseamelia, PhD 
Syr Administrator: TBD

Rural Medical Education, known as RMED, is an elective course tied to a clinical site placement for third-year medical students. Participating students complete three (of eight) core clinical rotations including: Family Medicine, Surgery and Emergency Medicine at a rural, or small town, clinical site. In addition to the three core clinical rotations, participating students complete the RMED Elective (FAMP1650) while living and training in a small town environment. For the elective, an emphasis is placed on the continuous and comprehensive care of patients. Students develop skills in the diagnosis and management of a wide range of common ambulatory and secondary hospital problems of patients across the age spectrum. Students participate in office hours and conduct inpatient rounds, laboratory work, night call, and case presentations with community-based attendings. Medical students negotiate site placements with the Assistant Dean of Rural Medicine, Dr. Carrie Roseamelia. A preference for acceptance into RMED is given to students that completed the Introduction to Rural Health course (FAMP1646) during their first and second year of medical school. Students with academic deficiencies or professionalism concerns cannot participate.

Academic Schedules

Third Year Clerkship Subject Exams

MSIV Year

Overview

The fourth year consists of twelve four-week periods beginning in April/May following the completion of required clerkships. The curriculum for this year consists of electives and acting internships selected by students as well as one required capstone course, Transition Into Residency. In order to graduate, students must complete at least 25 elective credit hours, including credits in both the basic and clinical sciences. For more additional information on the course selection procedures and policies by graduating class year, please visit this webpage: Clinical Course Offerings and Procedures.

 

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Electives

Intramural Electives

  • The College of Medicine offers over 200 electives. In January of the third year, students enroll in the Elective Lottery to select their electives for the fourth year. This process is faciliated through the Registrar's Office and is described in detail here: Electives and Elective Lottery. All electives offered through the College of Medicine can be found in the Course Selection Handbook. If students want to create an elective experience that they do not see offered in the Course Selection Handbook, they can propose a Unique Elective.

Away Electives

  • "Away Electives", which involves spending several weeks at other medical schools, at the Center for Disease Control or the National Institutes of Health, or seeing patients in medically underserved parts of the United States or in other countries. Some students take an away elective the summer after their first year at SUNY Upstate.

Unique Electives

  •  Unique Electives, are electives proposed by students who wish to do research in a specific field which will allow them more in depth exposure to that particular area of medicine.  The forms should be filled out six weeks prior to the date that research/elective is scheduled to begin.

Acting Internships

All MSIV are required to take at least one Acting Internship(AI) consisting of four credits at Upstate Medical University. Approved Acting Internships can be found here.

Transition to Residency

This required, three-credit capstone course is designed to prepare students for their first day as an intern. The course consists of large-group lectures, small-group discussions, procedures and simulations.

Step 2

MSIV students are required to take and pass Step 2 CK as a graduation requirement. Our students must sit for both components of the exam by December 1st of their fourth year.

Clinical Skills Exam (CSE)

The CSE is required to be taken by all students transitioning to the MSIV year. Students must pass the CSE as a graduation requirement. The exam is taken in the Clinical Skills Center and consists of multiple stations that test the clinical skills acquired throughout the MSIII year.

Electives

The College of Medicine offers more than 200 electives: everything from classes taken on campus, to several weeks abroad working in a clinic. Students may take electives throughout the four years of medical school.

Here are just a few examples:

  • Unique Electives, are electives proposed by students who wish to do research in a specific field which will allow them more in depth exposure to that particular area of medicine.  Paperwork must be received and approved prior to the start of the proposed elective.
    NO RETROACTIVE CREDIT WILL BE GIVEN.
  • Basic Spanish Electives, prepares medical students to communicate effectively with patients with limited English proficiency. 
  • Medical Spanish Electives, build on the strong foundation of the Basic Spanish level.
  • Consortium for Culture and Medicine courses (CCM), which are offered in conjunction with Syracuse University and LeMoyne College. Courses cover topics such as bioethics; the economic and legal aspects of health care; literature and death; disability and identity, and much more.
  • Hospice Volunteering, which includes intensive training and visits with patients in their homes. The goal is to enhance quality of life at the end of life by supporting patients and their families.
  • "Away Electives", which involves spending several weeks at other medical schools, at the Center for Disease Control or the National Institutes of Health, or seeing patients in medically underserved parts of the United States or in other countries. Some students take an away elective the summer after their first year at SUNY Upstate.
  • MSI/MSII Electives
  • MSIII Concurrent Electives
  • Remote elective examples during COVID

All offered electives can be found in the course selection book:

Course Selection Book



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