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Upstate Regional Rehabilitation Hip and Knee Joint Replacement Video

Total Joint Program

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Why rehabilitation is important after a joint replacement?

The goal of Upstate University Hospital Regional Rehabilitation Center is to help patients reduce disability and improve independence and quality of life.

 

Due to the nature of joint replacement surgery, the post-operative pain, muscle weakness, decreased mobility, decreased proprioception (the perception or awareness of the position of the body) during the recovery process can limit the results of the surgery and quality of life achieved. For this reason, rehabilitation of a new joint should be completed under the direction and supervision of a trained professional such as a physical and occupational therapist. Patients should discuss the timing for when and how to have this rehabilitation with their surgeon, therapist and the healthcare practitioners involved in their care.

 

Upstate Community Hospital Orthopedics has a Center of Excellence designation for hip and knee replacement that offers a comprehensive rehabilitation program for individuals who have had a joint replacement. Services offered by Upstate rehabilitation include prehabilitation (therapy prior to surgery), pre-operative total joint classes, and post-operative rehabilitation from hospitalization through to the end of recovery. Patients should contact their orthopedic provider for information regarding these services if not already discussed prior to surgery.

Treatment

Total joint replacement physical therapy includes a multifaceted approach with patient specific goals in mind. Therapists in all settings at Upstate's Regional Rehabilitation Center will complete an individualized assessment, and prescribe a treatment plan based on your specific needs and goals. Your therapist will help you every step of the way, providing one-on-one, evidence-based treatment sessions to help you maximize the function of your new joint.

 

Before your surgery: Prehabilitation (pre-operative physical therapy) begins several months to weeks prior to a patient’s joint replacement surgery and includes evaluation and treatment designed to improve a patient’s strength, range of motion, balance and pain control prior to surgery. Also, prehabilitation helps patients plan for post-operative recovery including discussion of what type of equipment will be most helpful (such as a rolling walker, or shower chair), and how to prepare their home to maximize safety and function.

 

During your hospital stay: Post-operative rehabilitation begins on the afternoon of surgery or early the next morning. Therapy is scheduled at least twice a day during hospitalization. It is important to begin therapy very soon after surgery to minimize the risk of complications and maximize the function of the new joint. Therapy during a hospitalization is aimed at improving function and safety while beginning to rehabilitate the patient’s new joint.

 

After your hospital stay: Physical therapy after discharge from the hospital will be prescribed based on the type of surgery performed, surgeon preference, and the patient’s specific needs.

  • Some patients will require a short-term rehabilitation stay in a facility if they are unable to safely return home. This is rare. Physical therapy is provided daily with a focus towards improving quality of movement and independence with mobility. Therapy will continue depending on the patient’s needs once discharged from the rehabilitation facility.
  • Other patients will be able to return directly to home after discharge from the hospital but have a difficult time moving, and are homebound. In this case, the therapist will come to the patient’s home 1-3 visits per week for several weeks to provide home physical therapy. Therapy will be focused on home safety, quality of movement and independence with mobility.
  • Most people will move well enough to attend outpatient physical therapy immediately following hospitalization. Most surgeons prefer this to make use of specialized rehabilitation equipment available in clinics. Outpatient physical therapy will typically involve 1-3 visits per week for several weeks after your surgery. Therapy in this setting is focused on fine tuning the new joint, restoring balance and alignment, and maximizing function in higher level activities.

 

Interventions for therapy across settings may include:

  • Activities of daily living and independent living skills
  • Home safety education
  • Gait training/stair training
  • Strength training
  • Flexibility and range of motion exercises
  • Balance training
  • Use of cryotherapy (ice)
  • Manual therapy
  • Electrical stimulation
  • Neuromuscular reeducation
  • Biofeedback

Helpful Links:

                          A physician’s referral is required in order to receive therapy services.

                              To contact the Regional Rehabilitation Center call: 315-464-6543

                                                                        Fax: 315-464-475

Providers

Jillian E Cardinali, PT, DPT
Jillian E Cardinali, PT, DPT
315 464-6543

Education & Fellowships

  • DPT: SUNY Upstate Medical University, 2013, Physical Therapy

Diseases/Specialties/Treatments

Physical Therapy; Pelvic Floor Disorders; Pelvic Organ Prolapse; Physical Therapy for Women's Health

Jennifer L Collis, PT, DPT
Jennifer L Collis, PT, DPT
315 464-6543

Education & Fellowships

  • DPT: SUNY Upstate Medical University, 2015

Diseases/Specialties/Treatments

Physical Therapy; Achilles Tendon Injury; Acute Pain; Ankle Sprain; Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injury; Carpal Tunnel Syndrome; more

Associations/Memberships

  • American Physical Therapy Association (APTA)

Nicole M Conese, PT, DPT
Nicole M Conese, PT, DPT
315 464-6543

Education & Fellowships

  • DPT: University of Maryland at Baltimore, 2015, Physical Therapy
  • BS: University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 2012, Exercise Science

Diseases/Specialties/Treatments

Physical Therapy; Certified Brain Injury Specialist (CBIS); Neurology; Alzheimer's Disease - Dementia; Brain Injury; Brain Tumor; more

Clinical Interests

  • stroke, brain injury and spinal cord injury rehabilitation, vestibular rehabilitation

Associations/Memberships

  • American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), Neurology Section

Carol Fabbri, PT
Carol Fabbri, PT
315 492-5917

Education & Fellowships

  • BS: University of Pittsburgh, 1981, Physical Therapy

Diseases/Specialties/Treatments

Physical Therapy; Acute & Chronic Diseases and Conditions in Adult Patients

Mindy L Heath, PT, DPT
Mindy L Heath, PT, DPT
315 464-6543

Education & Fellowships

  • DPT: SUNY Upstate Medical University, 2014, Physical Therapy

Diseases/Specialties/Treatments

Acute & Chronic Diseases and Conditions in Adult Patients; Acute Pain; Trauma; Acute Pain; Amputee Rehabilitation; Chronic Pain Rehabilitation; more

Associations/Memberships

  • American Physical Therapy Association (APTA)

Christina T Legg, PT, DPT
Christina T Legg, PT, DPT
315 464-6543

Education & Fellowships

  • DPT: SUNY Upstate Medical University, 2016
  • BS: SUNY Binghamton, 2011, Integrative Neuroscience

Diseases/Specialties/Treatments

Physical Therapy; Amputation; Brain Injury; Falls; Hip Fracture; Stroke; more

Maureen A Mancuso, PT, DPT, GCS
Maureen A Mancuso, PT, DPT, GCS
315 464-6543

Education & Fellowships

  • DPT: SUNY Upstate Medical University, 2012

Diseases/Specialties/Treatments

Physical Therapy; Concussion; Balance and Fall Prevention, Rehab Service; Concussion Management; Concussion Management, Rehab Service; Orthopedic Physical Therapy

Associations/Memberships

  • American Physical Therapy Association (APTA)

Allison A Murray, PT, DPT
Allison A Murray, PT, DPT
315 464-6543

Diseases/Specialties/Treatments

Physical Therapy; Acute & Chronic Diseases and Conditions in Adult Patients; Amputation; Brain Injury; Stroke; Acute Illness & Injury Management; more

Clinical Interests

  • Stroke Rehabilitation

    Brain Injury Rehabilitation

    Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation


Tara L Price, BS in Occupation Therapy Science
Tara L Price, BS in Occupation Therapy Science
315 464-6543

Education & Fellowships

  • BS: Utica College, 1996, Occupational Therapy

Diseases/Specialties/Treatments

Geriatrics; Occupational Therapy; Stroke Rehabilitation

Lisa E Rothwell, PT
Lisa E Rothwell, PT
315 464-6543

Education & Fellowships

  • BS: SUNY Buffalo, 1988, Physical Therapy

Diseases/Specialties/Treatments

Physical Therapy; Dizziness and Vertigo; Vestibular Rehabilitation

Education Interests

  • Health and wellness, Aging and longevity

Clinical Interests

  • Burns, SCI, neurological disorders, balance, seating and positioning, TBI


Kaitlin M Skiff, PT, DPT
Kaitlin M Skiff, PT, DPT
315 464-6543

Education & Fellowships

  • DPT: Ithaca College, 2010

Diseases/Specialties/Treatments

Physical Therapy; Concussion; Foot and Ankle; Knee Pain; Low Back Pain; Neck Injuries; more

Thomas M Spangenberg, PT, DPT, CSCS
Thomas M Spangenberg, PT, DPT, CSCS
315 464-6543

Education & Fellowships

  • DPT: SUNY Upstate Medical University, 2013
  • BS: University of Rochester, 2007

Diseases/Specialties/Treatments

Physical Therapy; Achilles Tendon Injury; Ankle Sprain; Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injury; Arthritis; Bone Chips in the Elbow; more

Education Interests

  • McKenzie Method of Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy

Clinical Interests

  • Treatment of low back pain and spinal related disorders.  Management of acute and chronic orthopedic conditions. Sports injuries and rehabilitation.


Jasmine S Stackhouse
Jasmine S Stackhouse
315 464-6543

Education & Fellowships

  • MS: LeMoyne College, Syracuse NY, 2017, Occupational Therapy

Kerry Walsh, PT, DPT, GCS, CEEAA
Kerry Walsh, PT, DPT, GCS, CEEAA
315 464-6543

Education & Fellowships

  • DPT: SUNY Upstate Medical University, 2008
  • BS: Boston College, 2003, Biology

Diseases/Specialties/Treatments

Physical Therapy; Geriatric Physical Therapy; Falls; Hip Fracture; Knee Pain; Low Back Pain; more

Clinical Interests

  • Geriatrics, Balance and Falls

Associations/Memberships

  • American Physical Therapy Association (APTA)

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