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Simulation Center offers realistic medical training, no risk to 'patients'

Nurses Michael Ortiz, left, and Taryn Bitzer practice their skills on a high-tech dummy that can produce the reactions and medical problems of a real patient in the Simulation Center at Upstate Medical University. Ortiz works at Upstate University Hospital, and Bitzer works at Crouse Hospital; both are studying to be nurse practitioners at the Upstate College of Nursing. (photo by Robert Mescavage)

Nurses Michael Ortiz, left, and Taryn Bitzer practice their skills on a high-tech dummy, which can imitate the medical problems and reactions of a real patient, in the Simulation Center at Upstate Medical University. Ortiz works at Upstate University Hospital, and Bitzer works at Crouse Hospital; both are studying to be nurse practitioners at the Upstate College of Nursing. (photo by Robert Mescavage)

Darren Carboni, left, and Erik Rufa, MD (photo by Jim Howe)

Darren Carboni, left, and Erik Rufa, MD (photo by Jim Howe)

An $11 million teaching center opened at Upstate Medical University recently that allows for the simulation of real-time responses to medical emergencies and procedures. The new Sim Center is meant to improve patient safety and patient care, explain Darren Carboni, the director of interprofessional education and university simulation, and Erik Rufa, MD, the director of education in the Sim Center. The 8,600-square foot space includes rooms that look just like hospital rooms and surgical suites, including high-tech mannequins to be used for medical simulations. Hands-on technical skills will be practiced. Medical, nursing and other students also will learn teamwork, communication, decision making, leadership and how to prioritize under pressure, they say.

 

 

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