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Explaining the most common bleeding disorders in children -- and how to stop a common nosebleed

Andrea Dvorak, MD (photo by Jim Howe)

Andrea Dvorak, MD (photo by Jim Howe)

When you get cut and bleed, your body normally would form a blood clot to stop the bleeding. To form blood clots, you need cells called platelets and proteins known as clotting factors. People with bleeding disorders either don't have enough platelets or clotting factors, or they don't work correctly. Upstate pediatric hematologist Andrea Dvorak, MD, goes over the most common types of bleeding disorders in children. Some are inherited diseases. Some are not diagnosed until later in life. Two of the most common are hemophilia and von Willebrand disease. Dvorak talks about how bleeding disorders are treated and the impact they may have on a child's life. She also tells how to stop a common nosebleed.

8-21-19-Dvorak.mp3 (21.87 MB) (Click to open in new window or Right-Click to save-as)
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