MSII Courses (AY 2017-2018)

Foundation, Cancer  (Unit 1)

Course #: MFCR201
Course Credit: 4

Directors:

Joe Stein, PhD Tom Poole, PhD Robert Corona, MD
Joe Stein, PhD
(Pharmacology)
Tom Poole, PhD
(Cell and
Developmental Biology)
Robert Corona, MD
(Pathology)

Coordinator:

TBD
Please Contact:
Sarah McNamara or Fran Fischer

 

This first unit will prepare you for rest of the MS2 year and the Step 1 exam by focusing our attention on principles of pharmacology and general pathology. The unit will begin with an exercise in using mindfulness to help us focus. The foundations of pharmacology and pathology will include mechanisms of drug effects, cell injury and death, tissue repair and regeneration, and environmental and nutritional pathology. We will then turn to some general concepts of cancer including causes, prognosis, treatments and immune responses.

Blood, Immunity, Skin  (Unit 2)

Course #: MMSB201
Course Credit: 5

Directors:

Diana Gilligan Edward Shillitoe, PhD
Diana Gilligan, MD, PhD
(Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology)
Ed Shillitoe, PhD
(Microbiology &
Immunology)

 

Coordinator:

Carol Montalto
Carol Montalto

 

Unit 2 covers disorders of immunity, blood and skin. Disorders of immunity include autoimmunity, tissue rejection and hypersensitivity. Disorders of blood include defects in the development of immune cells, bone marrow and blood clotting. Skin disorders include infections by bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, as well as infectious complications of trauma and wound healing. The treatment of these conditions by pharmaceutical agents is emphasized. These topics are closely integrated with each other and with the other courses that are studied simultaneously.

Nervous System  (Unit 3)

Course #: MNSY201
Course Credit: 5

Directors:

Joseph Fullmer, MD, PhD Dana Mihaila, MD, PhD Rita Gamamurthy, MD
Joseph Fullmer, MD, PhD
(Pathology)
Dana Mihaila, MD, PhD
(Cell and Developmental
Biology)
Gita Ramamurthy, MD
(Psychiatry &
Behavioral Sciences)

 Coordinator:

No picture available
Juanita Gamble

 

Unit 3 “Nervous System” will provide a vertical integration with the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system studied in the first year, as well as a horizontal integration between behavioral sciences, pathology and pharmacology of the nervous system in the second year. Students will be guided toward a clear understanding of human behavior, behavioral manifestations of illness, psychopathology, diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders, including the pharmacological principles of modern therapeutics (mechanism of action, clinical indications and side effects of the drugs). CNS and muscle pathology will be described with an emphasis on common tumors in adult and pediatric populations as well as common neurodegenerative conditions. Modern evolving areas such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy and molecular features of tumors will be covered. Eye and head and neck pathology will also be discussed. Histologic features and prognosis will be emphasized.

Cardiovascular & Respiratory  (Unit 4)

Course #: MCIR201
Course Credit: 5

Directors:

Gary Johnson, MD Rebecca Greenblatt, PhD
Gary Johnson, MD
(Emergency Medicine)
Rebecca Greenblatt, PhD
(Microbiology/Immunology)

 

Coordinator:

Carol Montalto
Carol Montalto

 

This unit builds on the foundation of MS1 Unit 5. Students will use their knowledge of normal cardiac and pulmonary function as they learn to differentiate the deficiencies associated with infection, neoplasm, and anatomical pathology. Successful learners will be able to describe the common diseases that affect these systems, the most useful imaging and laboratory tests for differentiating among them, and the first-line treatments. When the first-line treatment is pharmacological, the Unit will include discussion of dosage and side effects. The Midterm Quiz and Unit Exam will integrate the threads of Microbiology, Pathology, and Pharmacology that run through the Unit. Lectures will include multiple examples of clinical relevance, and will coordinate with case-based learning in the Foundations of Reasoning in Medicine course and clinical learning in the Practice of Medicine course.

Renal, Reproductive, Endocrine  (Unit 5)

Course #: MENR201
Course Credit: 5

Directors:

Bob Newmyer, MD Tom Poole, PhD

Bob Newmyer, MD
(Pediatrics)

Tom Poole, PhD
(Cell and Developmental
Biology)

 Coordinator:

Erica Gough
Erica Gough

 

The home stretch! Students enter this unit coming off of winter break and anxious about the year in which they take Step 1. High yield clinical content in the unit includes syphilis, systemic lupus erythematosus, sexually transmitted infections, types 1 and 2 diabetes, arthritis, gout, breast cancer and male and female reproductive pathology. Given its role in these diagnoses and interplay with the reproductive system, renal pathophysiology receives attention in this unit although well beyond these confines. Beyond diabetes and its outsize relevance for today's clinician, pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, and bone pathology including derangements in metabolic homeostasis will be covered. The pharmacology related to treating alterations within endocrine axes will be coupled with clinical case discussions. Congenital and consequent neonatal infection will be surveyed. Step 1 relevance will be maintained throughout the unit by citing histopathologic, laboratory, radiographic, and patient characteristics that betray the mechanistic underpinnings of disease, which drive the Step 1 examination.

GI (Unit 6)

Course #: MGSI201
Course Credit: 5

Directors:

M. Osman Arif, MD Rebecca Greenblatt, PhD
M. Osman Arif, MD
(Internal Medicine)
Rebecca Greenblatt, PhD
(Microbiology/Immunology)

 

Coordinator:

Carol Montalto
Carol Montalto

 

This unit builds on the foundation of MS1 Unit 7 (5 Credit Hours). Students will use their knowledge of normal digestive function to understand the deficiencies associated with infection, neoplasm, and anatomical pathology. Successful learners will be able to describe the common diseases that affect these systems, their clinical manifestations, the most useful imaging and laboratory tests for differentiating among them, and their first-line treatments. When the first-line treatment is pharmacological, the Unit will include discussion of dosage and side effects. The Midterm Quiz and Unit Exam will integrate the threads of Microbiology, Pathology, and Pharmacology that run through the Unit. Lectures will include multiple examples of clinical relevance, and will coordinate with case-based learning in the Foundations of Reasoning in Medicine course and clinical learning in the Practice of Medicine course.

Foundations of Reasoning in Medicine 2  (FRM 2)

Course #: MPPH203
Course Credit: 5

Directors:

William Paolo, MD Matthew Thornton, MD
William Paolo, MD
(Emergency Medicine)
Matthew Thornton, MD
(Emergency Medicine)

 

Coordinator:

TBD - Please contact:
Kristen Vella

 

This longitudinal course is designed to promote the thought processes necessary to develop student's intellectual capacity as a practicing physician. FRM2 is primarily designed to teach the clinical reasoning skills necessary to evaluate patients, understand disease, and make rational, evidence-based decisions. As with FRM-1 students will also be expected to become proficient in peripherally related skills including the domains of ethics, law, biostatistics, epidemiology, economics, public policy, medical anthropology and sociology, and population health. These goals will be accomplished through small group sessions. During these sessions students will be expected to work through clinical cases in order to elicit the main teaching points of the sessions, develop differential diagnoses, and concept maps for the diagnosis and treatment of the disease their simulated patients will possess. In addition, Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) is a component of this course.

Practice of Medicine II

Course #: MPOM201
Course Credit: 8

Directors:

Joni Mitchell, MD Alison McCrone, MD
Joni Mitchell, MD
(Curriculum Office)
Alison McCrone, MD
(Curriculum Office)

 

Coordinator:

Kristen Vella
Kristen Vella

 

Students will continue to further master medical interviewing, physical examination and medical communications skills. Students will explore how to synthesize data gathering information into a plausible explanation of the patient’s health status. Students will learn patterns of disease and syndromes by utilizing the small group setting, engaging in clinical experiences and various special sessions.

Link to Academic Schedules