Cancer Screening Information

Since early detection is one of your best defenses against cancer, the Upstate Cancer Center offers screening for Breast, CervicalColorectalLung and Prostate cancers. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please call 315 464-HOPE (4673) to speak with an Upstate Cancer Center representative.

These guidelines are consistent with those of the American Cancer Society. Guidelines from other organizations may differ in some aspects, but all agree that maintaining a healthy lifestyle is your most important defense against cancer.

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At Any Age

Practice healthy lifestyle and be aware of any changes in your body such as:

  • New lumps or growths
  • Unusual bleeding
  • Changes in moles or skin
  • Unexpected weight loss
  • Cough
  • Change in bowel or bladder habits

Age 11-12

All boys and girls should receive a full course of the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Vaccine to protect against cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile, and throat cancers.

Age 20-29

At this age, a cancer-related check-up might be part of any health exam and might include exams for cancers of the thyroid, mouth, skin, lymph nodes, testicles, and ovaries.

These special tests for certain cancers are recommended for your age and sex:

MEN

HPV Vaccine

Complete the HPV vaccination series if not done before, up to age 21.

WOMEN

HPV Vaccine

Complete the HPV vaccination series if not done before, up to age 26.

Breast Cancer Screening

Report any breast changes to your health care provider or nurse without delay.

Find out if you are at higher than average risk for breast cancer. If not, then no test is needed at this time. If you are, talk to your health care provider about when you need to start getting mammograms or other tests.

Cervical Cancer Testing

No test is needed before age 21. Women between the ages of 21 and 29 should have a Pap test every 3 years.

Age 30-39

At this age, a cancer-related check-up might be part of any health exam and might include exams for cancers of the thyroid, mouth, skin, lymph nodes, testicles, and ovaries.

These special tests for certain cancers are recommended for your age and sex:

WOMEN

Breast Cancer Screening

Report any breast changes to your health care provider or nurse without delay.

Find out if you are at higher than average risk for breast cancer. If not, then no test is needed at this time. If you are, talk to your health care provider about when you need to start getting mammograms or other tests.

Cervical Cancer Testing

Have a Pap test and HPV test every 5 years or Pap test alone every 3 years.

No testing is needed after a hysterectomy that removed the uterus and cervix if it was done for reasons not related to cervical cancer.

Age 40-49

At this age, a cancer-related check-up should be part of any regular health exam and might include exams for cancers of the thyroid, mouth, skin, lymph nodes, testicles, and ovaries.

These special tests for certain cancers are recommended for your age and sex:

MEN

Colon Cancer Testing

Find out if you are at higher than average risk for colon cancer because of family history or other factors. If not, then no test is needed at this time. If you are at increased risk, talk to your health care provider about when you need to begin testing and what tests are right for you.

Prostate Cancer Testing

Men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer should talk with their health care providers about the uncertainties, risks, and potential benefits of testing beginning at age 45 so they can decide if they want to be tested. This includes African American men and men with close family members (father, brother, son) with prostate cancer.

Men with several close relatives who had prostate cancer before age 65 are at even higher risk and should talk with their health care providers beginning at age 40.

WOMEN

Colon Cancer Testing

Find out if you are at higher than average risk for colon cancer because of family history or other factors. If not, then no test is needed at this time. If you are at increased risk, talk to your health care provider about when you need to begin testing and what tests are right for you.

Breast Cancer Screening

Report any breast changes to your health care provider without delay. Discuss breast cancer screening with your provider. If you are at higher risk for breast cancer than most women, ask a healthcare professional about additional tests.

Cervical Cancer Testing

Have a Pap test and HPV test every 5 years or Pap test alone every 3 years.

Follow testing recommendations even if you have been vaccinated against HPV. No testing is needed after a hysterectomy that removed the uterus and cervix if it was done for reasons not related to cervical cancer.

Age 50 plus

At this age, a cancer-related check-up should be part of your regular health exam and might include exams for cancers of the thyroid, mouth, skin, lymph nodes, testicles, and ovaries. These special tests for certain cancers are recommended for your age and sex:

MEN

Colon Cancer Testing

Start testing at age 50. There are several testing options. Talk with a healthcare professional about which tests are best for you and how frequently tests should be done.

Prostate Cancer Testing

Starting at age 50, men should talk with their health care provider about the uncertainties, risks, and potential benefits of yearly testing so they can decide if they want to be tested.

Lung Cancer Screening

You are at high risk of lung cancer due to cigarette smoking if you are 55 through 75 years old AND have smoked at least one pack/day for 30 years history AND are either still smoking OR have quit within the last 15 years. Talk to your health care provider about getting a low dose chest CT scan to check for lung cancer.

WOMEN

Colon Cancer Testing

Start testing at age 50. There are several testing options. Talk with a healthcare professional about which tests are best for you and how frequently tests should be done.

Lung Cancer Screening

You are at high risk of lung cancer due to cigarette smoking if you are 55 through 75 years old AND have smoked at least one pack/day for 30 years history AND are either still smoking OR have quit within the last 15 years. Talk to your health care provider about getting a low dose chest CT scan to check for lung cancer.

Breast Cancer Screening*

Report any breast changes to your health care provider or nurse without delay. Have a mammogram every year. If you are at higher risk for breast cancer than most women, ask a healthcare professional about additional tests.

Cervical Cancer Testing

TestingHave a Pap test and HPV test every 5 years or Pap test alone every 3 years.

Follow testing recommendations even if you have been vaccinated against HPV. No testing is needed after a hysterectomy that removed the uterus and cervix if it was done for reasons not related to cervical cancer.

Age over 65

At this age, a cancer-related check-up should be part of your regular health exam and might include exams for cancers of the thyroid, mouth, skin, lymph nodes, testicles, and ovaries. These special tests for certain cancers are recommended for your age and sex:

MEN

Colon Cancer Testing

Get tested regularly. Talk with a healthcare professional about which tests are best for you and how frequently tests should be done. The decision to be screened for colon cancer after age 75 should be made on an individual basis. If you are older than 75, ask your health care provider if you should be screened.

Prostate Cancer Testing

Men who can expect to live at least 10 more years should talk with their health care providers about the uncertainties, risks, and potential benefits of yearly testing so they can decide if they want to be tested.

Lung Cancer Screening

You are at high risk of lung cancer due to cigarette smoking if you are 55 through 75 years old AND have smoked at least one pack/day for 30 years history AND are either still smoking OR have quit within the last 15 years. Talk to your health care provider about getting a low dose chest CT scan to check for lung cancer.

WOMEN

Colon Cancer Testing

Get tested regularly. Talk with a healthcare professional about which tests are best for you and how frequently tests should be done. The decision to be screened for colon cancer after age 75 should be made on an individual basis. If you are older than 75, ask your health care provider if you should be screened.

Lung Cancer Screening

You are at high risk of lung cancer due to cigarette smoking if you are 55 through 75 years old AND have smoked at least one pack/day for 30 years history AND are either still smoking OR have quit within the last 15 years. Talk to your health care provider about getting a low dose chest CT scan to check for lung cancer.

Breast Cancer Screening*

Report any breast changes to your health care provider or nurse without delay. Have a mammogram every year. If you are at higher risk for breast cancer than most women, ask a healthcare professional about additional tests.

Cervical Cancer Testing

No testing is needed if you have had regular cervical cancer testing with normal results.

No testing is needed after a hysterectomy that removed the uterus and cervix if it was done for reasons not related to cervical cancer.

Women with a history of a serious cervical pre-cancer should continue testing for 20 years after that diagnosis.

* The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends mammography for average-risk women every two years beginning at age 50 and ending at age 75.

Stay healthy and reduce your cancer risk:

  • No Tobacco Products
  • Maintain Healthy Weight
  • Regular Physical Activity
  • Vaccinate Females and Males (9-26 years) Against Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Eat Healthy Foods
  • Limit Alcohol Intake
  • Protect Your Skin From Sun Exposure
  • Know Your Risk Factors
  • Have Regular Check-ups
  • Get Screened for Cancer
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